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Monocots VI


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Monocots VI - Scientific Program

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

Monday 08 October

W. John Kress, Ph.D.

Smithsonian Institution, USA

Monocots in the Anthropocene: Species Interactions in a Rapidly Changing World

W. John Kress is Distinguished Scientist and Curator of Botany at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. He formerly served as the Interim Under Secretary for Science at the Smithsonian and Director of Science in the Grand Challenges Consortia. He received his education at Harvard University (B. A., 1975) and Duke University (Ph. D., 1981). His research interests include plant evolution, taxonomic classification, and biodiversity conservation. Dr. Kress is an Honorary Fellow of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation, received the Parker-Gentry Award for Biodiversity and Conservation from the Field Museum of Natural History.





Tuesday 09 October

Elizabeth A. Kellogg, Ph.D.

Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, USA

Spikelet Pairs in Andropogoneae

Presence of paired spikelets is diagnostic for Andropogoneae. Developmentally, the paired spikelets originate from an enlarged branch meristem that converts rapidly to spikelet meristems, one sessile and one pedicellate, a pattern controlled by a uniquely derived genetic network. The pair is also subtended by an abscission zone, the position of which is synapomorphic for Andropogoneae s.s. In other panicoid grasses, the abscission zone forms below the spikelet and the change in position occurred before diversification of the tribe. In Andropogoneae spikelets of the pair have partitioned the ancestral functions, with one being dedicated to seed bearing and largely encased in a hard covering (glume) and the other staminate, sterile or missing entirely. When present, the pedicellate spikelet serves as a nurse tissue providing photosynthate to the developing seed in the sessile spikelet. The diagnostic - and uniquely derived - character for Andropogoneae is thus not just the pair of spikelets, but also the position of the abscission zone, the underlying genetic network, and the functions in dispersal and photosynthesis. The morphology of a simple pair of spikelets thus offers additional layers of insight into evolutionary mechanisms and potential selective forces.





Wednesday 10 October

Christine Bacon, Ph.D.

University of Gothenburg, Sweden

The road to evolutionary success: insights from Mauritia flexuosa

Mauritia flexuosa has one of the widest distributions of all palms, covering millions of hectares across northern South America, where it forms extensive, high-density stands. How does a species reach this wide distribution and high abundance in the face of strong competition in hyperdiverse tropical forests as well as persist through extreme landscape and climate changes throughout the Cenozoic (last ca. 65 mya)? Evolutionary success is related to historical contingency, genetic variation, and demography. Here I present a robust approach to understanding diversification in the tribe Lepidocaryeeae, showing how clade competition contributed to persistence through geological time. Within the Mauritia lineage, I show extinction patterns using the pollen fossil record, leading to low species diversity in the genus. I also review how climatic change during the Quaternary influenced the extant demography and distribution of M. flexuosa. Mauritia flexuosa presents significant genetic differentiation among different river basins and between the Amazonian and Cerrado biomes. Touching on environmental correlations across the genome, I conclude by contrasting adaptive selection with genomic plasticity. Our work provides new insights into the historical factors that affected geographical distribution and structured genetic diversity, contributing to long-term evolutionary success.



Thursday 11 October

Gerhard Zotz, Ph.D.

University Oldenburg, Germany & Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama

A Sceptic's view on Scientific "Facts" and "Concepts"

Absorbed by our daily science routine and the struggle for survival ("publish or perish") we rarely pause to contemplate the way we do science, established “facts” are rarely questioned, and we easily overlook common pitfalls and problems. I want to guide the audience through a stimulating and possibly provocative journey that addresses the topics data quality, continuous vs. discontinuous variation, ambiguous data interpretation, premature generalisations, and a number of other conceptual issues. I will use numerous examples, mostly from studies with monocots, to illustrate my points. I finish my talk with a few, rather optimistic remarks on science in the times of global change and alternative facts.



Friday 12 October

Rafaela C. Forzza, Ph.D.

Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Marccus Alves, Ph.D.

Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil

Monocots is the Brazilian Flora 2020: facilitate access to plant diversity

The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) was established by the Conference of Parties in 2002 to decrease the loss of plant diversity, reduce poverty and contribute to sustainable development. To achieve this overarching goal, the GSPC has established a series of targets, one of which is to ensure that plant diversity is well understood, so that it can be effectively conserved and used in a sustainable manner. Brazil hosts more than 32,000 species of Angiosperms representing one of the most biodiverse countries on Earth, and playing a key role in the GSPC. To meet the GSPC goals of Target 1 and facilitate access to plant diversity, Brazil committed to preparing the List of Species of the Brazilian Flora (2008–2015) and the Brazilian Flora 2020 (2016–present). Overall, the system contains information on 47 families, 740 genera (89 of them are endemic to Brazil), and 8,991 native and naturalized monocot species (5,359 endemic) several of them under some level of threat. Almost 40% have been described including identification keys, field images and botanical illustrations. The Atlantic Forest has the highest diversity of monocot species in the country and holds 4,801 species, ca. 60% of them are endemic to the Domain.



Accepted symposia


This section will be constantly updated.

Monday 08 October (8:00-11:30)

Symposium title:  Neotropical Eriocaulaceae: answering evolutionary questions and supporting sustainability  
Monday 08 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Livia Echternacht and Paulo Takeo Sano

Symposium Abstract:    Eriocaulaceae are unique among the Monocots for its inflorescences in capitula. Most of its diversity is endemic to Brazil, especially in savannas and Campos Rupestres. Their inflorescences are traded as everlasting plants, contributing to local economies and culture. This symposium aims to integrate results in the fields of morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny, evolution, population ecology, biogeography, conservation, and applied botany.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:13

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)*
Marcelo Trovó (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro - Brazil); Fabiane Nepomuceno da Costa (Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha and Mucuri - Brazil) Diversity and the steps towards the Brazilian Flora 2020 30
Maurício Takashi Coutinho Watanabe (Instituto Tecnológico Vale de Desenvolvimento Sustentável - Brazil) Everlasting flowers: are molecular data solving systematic issues at last? 30
Alessandra Ike Coan (Unesp, Rio Claro - Brazil) What does the anatomy tell us about the biology and evolution of Eriocaulaceae? 30
Livia Echternacht (Federal University of Ouro Preto - Brazil) Eriocaulaceae in time and space revealing patterns of diversification in the savannas and Campos Rupestres 30
Rebeca Viana (University of São Paulo - Brazil) Knowledge co-production and community engagement as a way forward to integrate Monocots, society, and sustainability 30
Paulo Takeo Sano (University of São Paulo - Brazil) Bringing the parts: integrated results and knowledge in Eriocaulaceae 30
 

Symposium title: Zingiberales I - Evolution 
Monday 08 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Thiago Andre and Fernando Figueiredo

Symposium Abstract:            Zingiberales is a diverse pantropical order of understory giant herbs with roughly 100 million years of history. Recent years have seen remarkable advance in Zingiberales biological studies, ranging from natural history and ecology all its way through development, evolution, paleobiology up to systematics. Here most updated research with the Zingiberales will be integrated in two sections treating the evolution, systematics, and diversity.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:14

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Chelsea Specht (Cornell University, USA) Zingiberales phylogeny and evolution 30
Selena Y. Smith - (University of Michigan, USA) The fossil record of the Zingiberales 30
Alexandra C. Ley - (University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany) The evolution of epigynal glands in Zingiberales 30
Vinita Gowda (Indian Institutes of Science Education and Research, India) Origin of species complexes in gingers: a molecular and ecological approach to resolve taxonomic differences 30
Ajith Ashokan (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research India) Biogeography and floral evolution of the ginger lilies (Hedychium spp., Zingiberaceae) as inferred from a molecular phylogenetic approach 30
Thiago André (Universidade Federal do Oeste do Pará, Brazil) Speciation and morphological evolution in spiral gingers (Costaceae) 30
 

Symposium title: Growing knowledge on monocot vegetative anatomy
Monday 08 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Thales D. Leandro, Aline Oriani and Vera L. Scatena

Symposium Abstract: This symposium aims to disseminate relevant results on monocot vegetative anatomy. By using modern techniques, new data on root and stem functional anatomy, stem biomechanics, lateral meristems, and leaf anatomy and vasculature will be presented, including examples within Alismatales, Asparagales, and Poales.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:21

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Renata Schnablova (Institute of Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences, Průhonice - Czech Republic) A comparative study of shoot apical meristem and plant body organization with an emphasis on monocots 30
Linnea Hesse (University of Freiburg - Germany) Functional anatomy, biomechanics and development of the branch-stem-attachment of Dracaena marginata revealed using high-resolution MR 30
Aline Redondo Martins (Universidade Estadual Paulista/Ilha Solteira - Brazil) The Phoenix of Cerrado: anatomical explanation to the rapid response of Bulbostylis paradoxa to fire 30
Dmitry D. Sokoloff (Lomonosov Moscow State University - Russia) Leaf structure in Alismatales with an emphasis on evolution of 3D vasculature 30
Shirley Martins (Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná – Brazil) Evolution of Kranz anatomy in Cyperaceae 30
Ana Silvia Franco Pinheiro Moreira (Universidade Federal de Uberlândia - Brazil) The velamen of epiphytic orchids: variation in structure and correlations with water and nutrient absorption 30
 

Monday 08 October (14:00-17:30)

Symposium title:  Understanding Amaryllidaceae evolution using different approaches 
Monday 08 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Antonio Campos-Rocha, Alan W. Meerow and Julie Henriette Antoinette Dutilh

Symposium Abstract:      This symposium aims to aggregate South American, North American and European researchers from different scientific areas to present their most recent investigations in the Amaryllidaceae family.

Last update: 2018-06-08 09:11

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Agostina Belén Sassone (Instituto de Botánica Darwinion - Argentina) Revealing the evolutionary history of tribe Leucocoryneae (Alloideae) based on molecular, morphological and cytogenetic data 15
Alan William Meerow (United States Department of Agriculture - USA) Evolutionary patterns in the tetraploid Andean clade of Amaryllidaceae, with an emphasis on tribe Eucharideae 15
Antonio Campos Rocha Neto (Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Brazil) Systematic studies of the Brazilian endemic tribe Griffinieae 15
Edimar Faria Menezes Lopes (Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Brazil) The Griffinieae tribe: using leaf anatomy to help solve delimitation problems 15
Jaume Bastida Armengol (Universitat de Barcelona - Spain) The Amaryllidaceae as a sustainable source of natural products 15
John David (Royal Horticultural Society - United Kingdom) Phylogenetic analysis of the Strumariinae sheds light on generic concepts in the tribe 15
Jordan Bilsborrow (University of Reading - United Kingdom) Population genetics of Narcissus   15  
Kalman Könyves (Royal Horticultural Society - United Kingdom) Whole chloroplast genome analysis in Narcissus and its implications for our understanding of the evolution of the genus 15
Nathalia Susin Streher (Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Brazil) Lessons from flowering time 15
Nicolás García Berguecio (Universidad de Chile - Chile) Generic taxonomy of Amaryllidaceae tribe Hippeastreae 15
Nora H. Oleas (Universidad Tecnológica Indoamérica – Ecuador) Complex population histories of Phaedranassa species endemics in Ecuador 15
    Closure 15
 

Symposium title: Zingiberales II - Diversity
Monday 08 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Thiago Andre and Fernando Figueiredo

Symposium Abstract:      Zingiberales are organized in 8 families, more than 90 genera and about 2,000 species. Recent years have seen remarkable advance in  ecological, phylogenetic, and biogeographical studies which will be discussed in this second section of the Zingiberales meeting

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:18

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Flavia Costa (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil) Functional and biogeographical patterns of Zingiberales in the Amazon 30
Monica Carlsen and W. John Kress (Smithsonian Institution, USA) Heliconia diversity and diversification: coevolution at work 30
Eugenio Valderrama (Universidad del Bosque, Colombia) Explaining the differences in African and Neotropical species richness by comparing diversification rates in Renealmia L.f. (Zingiberaceae) 30
Mohamed Al-Gharaibeh - (University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany) A revised phylogeny of the family Marantaceae 30
Mariana Saka (Universidade Estadual Paulista, Brazil) Phylogeny and taxonomy of the extra-Amazonian species of Goeppertia Nees (Marantaceae) 30
Fernando Figueiredo (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil) Diversification dynamics of Marantaceae in Amazonia: the role of landscape transformation and functional strategies 30
 

Symposium title: Monocot phylogenomics 
Monday 08 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Thomas Givnish

Symposium Abstract: Phylogenomic approaches are rapidly spreading and provide a quantum leap in the power of analyses of evolutionary relationships within and among families of monocots. This symposium highlights the latest contributions by an international group of junior and senior researchers, using plastome-scale data to infer relationships among green and mycoheterotrophic species, reconstruct historical biogeography and patterns of net species diversification, assess patterns of organellar genome evolution during the transition to mycoheterotrophy, and analyze relationships and patterns of molecular evolution based on hundreds of nuclear loci. Collectively, these studies are helping revolutionize our understanding of monocot evolution.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:18

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Thomas Givnish* (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA), Daniel Spalink (University of Utah, USA), Alejandro Zuluaga (Universidad del Valle, Colombia), Sean Graham (University of British Colombia, Canada), Craig Barrett (West Virginia University, USA), Chodon Sass (University of California at Berkeley, USA), Chelsea Specht (Cornell University, USA), and Cécile Ané (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA) Monocot plastid phylogenomics, species diversification, and the power of multi-gene analyses 30
Katharina Nargar (James Cook University, Australia) Evolution of hyperdiverse Dendrobieae (Orchidaceae) in time and space: phylogenomic insights 30
Danilo José Lima de Sousa*  (Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Brazil), Ana Maria Giulietti Harley (Instituto Tecnológico Vale, Brazil), Spencer C. H. Barrett (University of Toronto, Canada), and Sean W. Graham (University of British Columbia, Canada) A phylogenomic study of Pontederiaceae, Commelinales   15
Sean W. Graham* (University of British Columbia, Canada), Marybel Soto Gomez (UBC, Canada), Qianshi Lin (UBC, Canada), Wesley Gerelle (UBC, Canada), Nathaniel Klimpert (UBC, Canada), Vincent S.F.T. Merckx (Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden University, The Netherlands), Vivienne K.Y. Lam (UBC, Canada), and Marybel Soto Gomez (UBC, Canada) Phylogenomics and comparative organellar genomics of monocot mycoheterotrophs and their green relatives 15
Craig Barrett (West Virginia University, USA) and Brandon Sinn (West Virginia University) Genome evolution in heterotrophic orchids   30
James Leebens-Mack (University of Georgia, USA) A nuclear phylogenomic view of monocot diversification   30
Michael McKain (University of Alabama, USA) Comparative analysis of genome evolution across monocots   30


Tuesday 09 October (8:00-11:30)

Symposium title: How can anatomy contribute to understanding monocot evolutionary patterns? 
Tuesday 09 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Aline Oriani, Thales D. Leandro and Vera L. Scatena

Symposium Abstract: This symposium aims to present recent advances on reproductive anatomy of monocots, including examples of different orders such as Dioscoreales, Pandanales, Zingiberales and Poales. Data on floral anatomy and development, inflorescences patterns, and fruit anatomy will be presented under an evolutionary perspective.

Last update: 2018-05-09 08:46

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Chelsea Specht (Cornell University, USA) Adaptation of monocot flower form: an evo-devo approach to study adaptive evolution in flower morphology 30
Bruce K. Kirchoff (The University of North Carolina Greensboro - USA) Floral anatomy and development of Zingiberales 30
Elaine L. P. Nunes (Universidade Federal do Paraná - Brazil) Floral development in Orchidaceae: evolutionary origin of the calyculus in Dendrobieae 30
Margarita V. Remizowa (Lomonosov Moscow State University - Russia) Evolution of syncarpy in monocots 30
Thomas Stützel (Ruhr-Universität Bochum - Germany) Evolution of the inflorescences in monocots 30
Marcela Thadeo (Universidade Estadual de Maringá - Brazil) Anatomy of fresh fruits in monocots 30
 

Symposium title: Systematics, evolution, and biogeography of Orchidaceae
Tuesday 09 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Edlley Pessoa

Symposium Abstract: Currently, we enjoy somewhat stability to the orchid classification, it is a result of years of phylogenetic studies which have been developed in the last two decades to its main clades. Now, the next challenging step is to understand the evolution at lower taxonomic levels and investigate biogeographical patterns. This symposium will be focused on recent studies based on modern methods in systematics, evolution, and biogeography of Orchidaceae.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:29

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Adam Karremans (University of Costa Rica - Costa Rica) Pleurothallidinae, are we there yet?   30
Cássio van den Berg (Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - Brazil) To be announced 30
Climbie Hall (Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi -Brazil)   A new look at the Zygopetalinae (Orchidaceae) phylogeny, with focus on the Brazilian species 30
João Batista Nogueira Aguiar (Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - Brazil) Current knowledge and perspectives in Habenaria (Orchidaceae) systematics 30
Katharina Nargar (The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organism -Australia) Evolution of Australia’s rich endemic orchid flora in time and space – phylogenomic insights.   30
Oscar Perez-Escobar (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew - UK) Origin and diversification of Neotropical orchids in the Andes 30
 

Symposium title:  Genomic Innovation through Genome Duplication: Examples from across Monocots
Tuesday 09 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Michael McKain and Alex Harkess

Symposium Abstract:  This symposium will highlight cutting-edge research on the impact of whole genome duplication as it relates to species diversity, physiological novelty, development gene network, and ecological adaptations. Speakers will cover a wide diversity of species, including crops, while providing a genome level overview of monocot evolution. Featured techniques range from transcriptomics and sequence capture to whole genome sequencing and demonstrate the wide array of evolutionary genomic research found in the monocots.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:21

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Alex E. Harkess (Donald Danforth Plant Science Center - USA) Origins of a Novel Monocot Dicer-like Protein 30
Michael R. McKain (University of Alabama - USA) Genomic Plasticity in Prairie Grasses 30
Craig Barrett (University of West Virginia – USA) Genome Expansion in Palms 30
Madelaine Barrett (University of Massachusetts Amherst - USA) Gene network duplication and novel development in maize 30
Karolina Heyduk (University of Georgia - USA) Alternative paralog usage across independent origins of CAM in monocots 30
Monica Carlsen (Missouri Botanical Gardens – USA) Polyploidy and Zingiberales Diversification 30
 

Tuesday 09 October (14:00-17:30)

Symposium title: The next generation of research on the evolution of Crassulacean acid metabolism: integrating physiology, ecology, and genomics
Tuesday 09 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Karolina Heyduk

Symposium Abstract: In this symposium, we will highlight the latest work by both classic scholars of CAM biology and the newest crop of CAM researchers. Recent developments in sequencing technology have made genomic sequences for non-model species a reality, and genome sequences now exist or are underway in all major monocot CAM lineages. Paired with classical work in physiology and ecology, the field of CAM biology is now poised to make great strides in advancing our understanding of CAM genomics. This integration of disciplines across plant biology is critical for the future success of CAM research. To that end, the symposium will focus on the many fields of plant biology that are required to address fundamental questions of CAM evolution in the monocots, including genomics, physiology, ecology, and economic botany.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:25

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Christian Lexer (University of Vienna - Austria)   Exploring CAM evolution in Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae) with phylogenomics, transcriptomics, and metabolite profiling 30
Karolina Heyduk (University of Georgia - USA) Evolution of CAM across the Agavoideae 30
Sarah Davis (The University of Ohio – USA) Results from field trials of Agave americana as a bioenergy feedstock 30
Jamie Males (Cambridge University – UK) Physiological adaptation in Bromeliaceae 30
Klaus Winter (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute - USA) CAM ecophysiology in monocots 30
Robert Van Buren (University of Illinois – USA) Functional characterization of CAM using the pineapple genome 30
 

Symposium title: Orchid Ecology and Conservation
Tuesday 09 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Edlley Pessoa

Symposium Abstract: Orchids have aroused the curiosity of researchers for centuries, including Darwin, mainly for their different ecological traits and pollination syndromes. Currently, with the development of modern molecular, statistical and computational methods, ecological research has embraced other fields such as evolution and conservation. This symposium will be focused on studies relied on multi-tools approaches, encompassing conservation, animal/plant interaction, and environment/orchids interaction.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:23

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Ana Paula Moraes (Universidade Federal do ABC- Brazil)   How chromosomes could limit the orchid distribution?   30
Ovidiu Paun (University of Vienna, Austria) Genomics and Dactylorhiza allotetraploids: specific adaptations to soil conditions differentiates a sister pair of species 30
Michael Fay (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew -UK)    Research in support of orchid conservation and reintroduction 30
Paulo Milet Pinheiro (Universidade Federal de Pernambuco - Brazil) Ecology of floral perfumes in the neotropical orchid genus Catasetum: does chemical composition predict pollinating orchid bee genera? 30
Samantha Koehler (Universidade Campinas - Brazil) How is polyploidy in Zygopetalum mackayi orchids related to biotic and abiotic variables within Eastern Brazilian rocky outcrops?   30
Giovanni Scopece  (Università di Napoli -Italy)   The evolution of reproductive isolation in Mediterranean orchids.   30
 

Symposium title: Palms – The ecologically most diverse tropical plant family? 
Tuesday 09 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Wolf Eiserhardt

Symposium Abstract: This symposium will celebrate the diversity of palms, and showcase a range of cutting­edge studies unpicking various aspects of palm diversity, starting off with new historical insights into the early exploration of palm diversity by the 19th­century botanist Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius, followed by several talks on the phylogenetic diversification, evolutionary dynamics of and biogeography of the family. The second session will focus on palm ecology and conservation, addressing the drivers behind the variation that has led some to suggest that palms are record­holders also in terms of their ecological diversity.    

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:25

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Fred Stauffer (Botanical Garden of Geneva - Switzerland) Martius’ pioneering work on palm diversity 15
Wolf L. Eiserhardt (Aarhus University) Phylogeny and diversification of Madagascan palms 15
Sidonie Bellot (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew - UK) Phylogenomics and biogeography of South­East Asian Areceae 15
Alexander Zizka (University of Gothenburg - Sweden) Biogeography and diversification of the Lepidocaryeae 15
Craig Barrett (West Virginia University - USA) Phylogenomics of Brahea 15
Oriane Loiseau (University of Zurich – Switzerland) Macro and micro perspectives on Geonoma evolution 15
Bob Muscarella (Aarhus University – Denmark) Performance and distribution of Amazonian palms across soil gradients 15
Thaise Emilio (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew - UK) Palm hydraulic strategies and climatic ranges 15
Michael Kessler (University of Zurich – Switzerland) Local to regional ecology of the genus Geonoma 15
Rita Portela (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – Brazil) Effects of “primatization” on the population dynamics of a palm that is vulnerable to extinction 15
Caroline Dracxler (Natural History Museum Paris) Ecological aspects of animal-palm interactions 15
Vincent Fehr (Aarhus University)   Non-native palms as engineers of novel ecosystems in the Anthropocene: a global review 15
Rita Portela (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – Brazil) Invitation to the World Palm Symposium 2020 in Rio de Janeiro 5
 

Wednesday 10 October (8:00-11:30)

Symposium title: Monocot Phylogenomics II - new insights on genome evolution, diversification and biogeography 
Wednesday 10 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Flamboyant
         

Organizer(s): Oscar Alejandro Pérez Escobar, Tom Givnish, Wolf L. Eiserhardt, William J. Baker

Symposium Abstract: This symposium aims to provide an overview of the recent progress in broad-scale monocot phylogenomic research carried out partly at Kew gardens under the framework of the PAFTOL project (https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plant-and-fungal-trees-life), but also focussing on aspects of biogeography, diversification and character evolution in the clade. More importantly, we aim to identify key research questions concerning monocot evolution that remain unanswered but can now be tackled with new technological and methodological advances. 

Last update: 2018-07-24 12:39

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Wolf Eiserhard (Aarhus University) The Plant and Fungal Tree of Life project 30
Isabel Larridon (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew – UK) Changing tribal and generic concepts in Cyperaceae 30
Aline C. Martins (Universidade Federal de Paraná) From tree tops to the ground: Reversals to terrestrial habit in Galeandra orchids (Epidendroideae: Catasetinae) 30
Olwen Grace (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew – UK) The Asphodelaceae tree of life: phylogenomic evaluation of systematics in Aloe and related genera 30
Oscar Alejandro Pérez Escobar (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew – UK) New insights on orchid biogeography and diversification from hundreds of nuclear and plastid gene phylogenies and genomic composition 30
Diego Bogarín (Lankester Botanic Garden – Costa Rica; Naturalis Biodiversity Center) Anchored hybrid enrichment resolves a species complex derived from recent rapid diversifications 30


Symposium title: Advances on the anatomy of the large Poales clade       
Wednesday 10 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Aline Oriani, Thales D. Leandro and Vera L. Scatena

Symposium Abstract: This symposium aims to present recent results on floral development and embryology, inflorescence structure, and root and leaf anatomy of different families belonging to the Poales order using a comparative approach.

Last update: 2018-07-24 09:44

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Sofia Aumond Kuhn (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil) Vegetative and reproductive outstanding characters in Bromeliaceae 15
Aline Oriani (Universidade Estadual Paulista/Rio Claro – Brazil) Floral development and vasculature in Rapateaceae and Mayacaceae 15
Kaire de Oliveira Nardi (Universidade Estadual Paulista/Rio Claro – Brazil) Evolution of embryological traits in the xyrids 15
Erik Smets (KU Leuven - Belgium) The evolution of spikelets and flowers in Cyperoideae (Cyperaceae): a floral developmental approach 15
Peter Linder (University of Zurich - Switzerland) The phylogenetic and ecological correlates of variation in root anatomy of the African Restionaceae 15
Pascal-Antoine Christin (The University of Sheffield - UK) Evolutionary precursors, convergent evolution, and the origins of C4 leaf anatomy in grasses 15
Lynn G. Clark (Iowa State University - USA) Insights on the evolution of mesophyll cells in Poaceae 15
Thales D. Leandro (Universidade Estadual Paulista/Rio Claro - Brazil) Fusoid cells in the grass family Poaceae: a developmental approach 15
  Closure 15
 

Symposium title:  Recent advances in the systematics of Bromeliaceae
Wednesday 10 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Leonardo M. Versieux

Symposium Abstract:  This symposium aims to explore the most recent advances and changes in Bromeliaceae Systematics, from subfamilies to genera levels.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:29

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)*
Michael H.J. Barfuss (Univeristy of Vienna – Austria) Taxonomic revision of Bromeliaceae subfam. Tillandsioideae based on a multi-locus DNA sequence phylogeny and morphology 30
Talita Mota Machado (UFOPA – Brazil) Molecular phylogeny of Vriesea (Tillandsioideae) using NGS 30
Andy Siekkinen (Rancho Santa Ana Bot. Garden, USA)** Recent progresses in the systematics of Hechtioideae using NGS 30
Kurt Weising (Univ. Kassel, Germany) Recent advances in the Pitcairnioideae systematics 30
Julián Aguirre-Santoro (Colombia) Systematics of the Ronnbergia alliance (Bromelioideae) and new findings on the Northern Andes Puya and Guzmania 30
Georg Zizka (Senckenberg, Germany) Recent advances in the Bromelioideae Systematics 30
 

Wednesday 10 October (14:00-17:30)

Symposium title: Setaria as a model system for monocot development and biotechnology  
Wednesday 10 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Adriana Pinheiro Martinelli and Marcio Alves-Ferreira

Symposium Abstract: In this symposium, we will focus on the new model plant Setaria viridis. Setaria viridis belongs to Poaceae family, which is the most economically important monocot family, including sugarcane, sorghum, and maize. Each of the above listed members of the Poaceae undergoes C4 photosynthesis of carbon capture and fixation. They are also morphologically characterized as having a Kranz anatomy, such that bundle-sheath and mesophyll cells are arranged in concentric circles around the vascular bundles of the leaves. Due to the significance of C4 syndrome in biomass production, major efforts are being made to understand the developmental changes that have led to the multiple instances of C4 photosynthesis over the course of plant evolution. Setaria viridis has been proposed as a genetic model for C4 photosynthesis studies in grasses and several genetic tools have been created to validate its use. This symposium will present a panel of studies on S. viridis, from basic research to applied science, to illustrate the benefits of a model plant for C4 photosynthesis studies.

Last update: 2018-05-08 17:30

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Marina Martins Soldi (IB, USP, Brazil) Setaria viridis: a C4 model plant to study the regulation of carbon partitioning and growth 30
Hugo Molinari (EMBRAPA Agroenergia, Brazil) Setaria viridis as a model plant for functional genomic studies in C4 crops 30
Francisco Scaglia Linhares (CENA, USP, Brazil) Setaria viridis root onset: a story of many tales 30
Danilo Centeno (UFABC, Brazil) Respiratory metabolism on Setaria biomass production 30
Fernanda Reinert (UFRJ, Brazil) Setaria viridis as a platform for the study of morfophysiological responses to climate change 30
Marcio Alves-Ferreira (UFRJ, Brazil) Using Setaria as a model system to dissect vascular development in monocots 30


Symposium title:  Monocot mats on Gondwanan inselbergs: binding taxonomy, ecology and molecular aspects under a biogeographic view
Wednesday 10 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Luiza de Paula and Stefan Porembski

Symposium Abstract:    In this symposium, we aim to provide for the first time an overview on monocot-mats occurring on Gondwanan inselbergs, covering topics related to the main ecological strategies, species delimitation, patterns of species diversity, plant evolution and population genetics.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:45

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Stefan Porembski (Universität Rostock - Germany) Desiccation-tolerant vascular plants on inselbergs: a global perspective 30
Juliane Rexroth (Universität Rostock - Germany) Microsatellites in Xerophyta 30
Luiza de Paula (Universität Rostock - Germany) Community ecology of monocot mats on Brazilian inselbergs and remarks on microsatellites in Vellozia species 30
Renato de Mello-Silva (University of São Paulo - Brazil) Phylogeny, taxonomy and species delimitation in Velloziaceae 30
Rafaela Forzza (RJ Botanical Garden/University of São Paulo - Brazil) Richness and diversity of Bromeliaceae and Velloziaceae in inselbergs: why so many discrepancies? 30
Danilo Centeno (Federal University of ABC - Brazil) Metabolomics of Velloziaceae species and its evolutionary relationship with desiccation tolerance 30
 

Symposium title: Linking Macro and microevolution in Bromeliaceae       
Wednesday 10 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Clarisse Palma da Silva

Symposium Abstract: Bromeliads are good models for understanding how the interplay among evolutionary processes such as gene flow; genetic drift and natural selection influence species-level patterns of diversification (speciation and extinction) in Neotropics. In this symposium we will present and discuss current research linking population genetics to phylogenies and how population divergence may have or may have not promoted diversification on bromeliads.  

Last update: 2018-07-10 22:09

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)*
Clarisse Palma da Silva Linking Macro and microevolution in Bromeliaceae 30
Christian Lexer - University of Vienna - Austria Whole-genome and transcriptome signatures of diversification in bromeliads: crossing the micro / macro divide 30
Marcia Goetze - UFRGS - Brazil Insights about the evolutionary history of species of Aechmea subgenus Ortgiesia from southern Brazil 30
Juan Pizon -  Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán - Mexico Circumscrpition, diversity, and evolution of Tillandsia subg. Tillandsia based on a multi-locus DNA phylogenetic approach. 30
Oriane Loiseau - University of Lausanne - Switzerland Biogeographic history and macroevolutionary patterns in the core-Tillandsioideae with a focus on Vriesea 15
Gil Yardeni - University of Vienna - Austria Towards understanding the genomic substrate of diversification in Tillandsia subgenus Tillandsia 15
 Rachel Jabaily - Colorado College - USA Bromeliad life history evolution and conservation implications 30
 

Thursday 11 October (8:00-11:30)

Symposium title: III Symposium on Neotropical Araceae - Systematics and Evolution
Thursday 11 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Livia Godinho Temponi and Ivanilza Moreira de Andrade

Symposium Abstract: Neotropical Araceae are a conspicuous and ecologically significant component of the vegetation, particularly of humid forests, where in some regions like the Colombian Chocó they constitute one of the most speciose families of plants. In this symposium, major advance on the systematics of Araceae will be discussed and integrated.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:47

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Thomas B. Croat (Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, USA) An overview of research with Araceae 30
Alejandro Zuluaga (University of Wisconsin, USA) A new subfamiliy level phylogeny using nuclear data from Anchored Phylogenomics 30
Monica Carlsen (Missouri Botanical Garden, USA) Disentangling the Evolutionary History of Anthurium Schott (Araceae) using Genomic Scale Data 30
Eduardo Gomes Gonçalves (Universidade Católica Dom Bosco, Brazil) Naming the Turnarounds: Phylogeny, systematics and pollination biology in the Caladieae (Araceae) 30
Lourdes Soares (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil) Systematics and conservation of Heteropsis Kunth (Araceae) from Amazônia 30
Luana Silva Braucks Calazans (UFRJ, Museu Nacional, Brazil) Systematics and conservation of Urospatha Schott (Araceae). 30
 

Symposium title: Biogeography, ecology and macroevolution of grasses 
Thursday 11 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Maria Vorontsova, Lynn Clark and Elizabeth Kellogg

Symposium Abstract: With ca. 12,000 species, the Poaceae is the fifth most diverse family of angiosperms, and the most diverse by far to rely almost exclusively on wind pollination. Grasses occur on all continents, covering 30-40% of the Earth’s terrestrial surface, and are arguably the most ecologically successful of angiosperm families. In this symposium, we will focus on the biogeography, ecology and macroevolution of the grass family in order to explore the factors, both biotic and abiotic, and history underpinning this success.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:47

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Timothy Gallaher (University of Washington, U.S.A.), tjgallaher@gmail.com Phytoliths, paleoecology and the biogeography of grasses 30
Jill Preston (University of Vermont, U.S.A.), Jill.Preston@uvm.edu Historical contingency and the origin of tropical-temperate niche transitions in the grass family 30
Maria Vorontsova (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, England), M.Vorontsova@kew.org The grasses and grasslands of Madagascar 30
Renata Reinheimer (CONICET, Argentina), rreinheimer@santafe-conicet.gov.ar Grass inflorescence evolution 30
Lynn Clark (Iowa State University, U.S.A.), lgclark@iastate.edu Wind pollination and grass spikelet evolution 30
Peter Linder (University of Zurich, Switzerland), peter.linder@systbot.uzh.ch The Viking Syndrome—why grasses are so successful 30
 

Symposium title: Ecophysiology of Bromeliaceae  
Thursday 11 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Helenice Mercier

Symposium Abstract: This symposium aims to present current research about Bromeliaceae ecophysiology

Last update: 2018-07-02 17:43

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)*
Ana Zangirolame Gonçalves (USP, Brazil) Ecophysiological strategies in Bromeliaceae: how distinct traits favored their irradiance in a wide range of environments. 30
Catarina Nievola (IBt, Brazil) Cold tolerance in the tropical bromeliads. 30
Cèline Leroy (Institute de Recherche pour le Dévelopment, French Guyana) Effects of drought gradients on the performance of tank bromeliads 30
Andrew Smith (University of Oxford, UK) Exploring the bioclimatic niche of C3 and CAM bromeliads 30
Jamie Males (University of Oxford, UK) Divergent and convergent evolution of leaf anatomy in the adaptive ecophysiology of Bromeliaceae 30
 Helenice Mercier (USP, Brazil) Exploring the physiological and molecular aspects of some functional pathways along the leaves of Guzmania monostachia (Bromeliaceae) 30
 

Thursday 11 October (14:00-17:30)

Symposium title: III Symposium on Neotropical Araceae – Floristics, Morphology and Evolution
Thursday 11 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Livia Godinho Temponi and Ivanilza Moreira de Andrade

Symposium Abstract: Neotropical Araceae are a conspicuous and ecologically significant component of the vegetation, particularly of humid forests, where in some regions like the Colombian Chocó they constitute one of the most speciose families of plants. In this symposium, major advances in the floristics, morphological studies and evolution of Neotropical Araceae will be discussed and integrated.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:49

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Simon Joseph Mayo (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK) Heinrich Schott and the importance of Brazil for aroid systematics in the 19th century 30
Cassia Mônica Sakuragui (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) New insights on Philodendron floral evolution 30
Alessandra Ike Coan, (Universidade Estadual Paulista, Brazil) Development and anatomy of reproductive organs of Anthurium Schott (Araceae, Alismatales) and their implications for taxonomy 30
Marcus Alberto Nadruz Coelho, Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Brazilian Flora 2020: Araceae 30
Lívia Godinho Temponi (Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Brazil) Araceae from Minas Gerais, Brazil: Flora, endemism and conservation 30
Ivanilza Moreira de Andrade (Universidade Federal do Piauí, Brazil) Repatriating Araceae taxonomic data from European collections to Brazil 30
 

Symposium title:  Advances in molecular phylogeny, systematics and evolution of Dioscoreales
Thursday 11 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Juan Viruel

Symposium Abstract:      This symposium aims to highlight major and recent developments in Dioscoreales research stemming from various research areas across different continents. At the end we propose some time to discuss further research strategies with the order.

Last update: 2018-06-08 09:11

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Marybel Soto Gomez (University of British Columbia - Canada) Towards a reclassification of Dioscoreales using phylogenomics and morphology 30
Sean W. Graham (University of British Columbia - Canada) Welcome to the dark side: Organellar genome evolution in heterotrophic Dioscoreales     30
Paul Wilkin (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew - UK) Yam phylogenetic relationships, conservation and use: what do we know, and what do we need to know? 30
Ricardo Couto (Museu Nacional/UFRJ - Brazil) Evolution and biogeography of Neotropical Dioscorea and their key morphological traits 30
Lauren Raz (Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Colombia) Dioscorea as a window into human cultural evolution: from the cognitive revolution to the sexual revolution and beyond 30
Juan Viruel (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew - UK) Phylogenomics of Dioscorea: the influence of polyploidy on the evolution of the genus 30
 

Symposium title:  Applied botany: Use of comparative data in horticulture, reproductive biology and systematics of Bromeliaceae 
Thursday 11 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Leonardo M. Versieux

Symposium Abstract:        This symposium aims to explore the different data that have been applied to characterize, to develop, and improve the understanding of different fields, namely the horticulture and systematics of the bromeliads. We will seat together and discuss how different techniques and methods may be used and integrated towards a collaborative and multidisciplinary approach.

Last update: 2018-06-25 10:07

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)*
Fernanda Vidigal (Embrapa) Conservation strategies and new research approaches for the genus Ananas 30
Hilo Souza (Embrapa) Bromeliads hybridization: potential and limits for the horticultural trade investigated under micromorphology 30
Kleber Resende (Unesp, Rio Claro) Can vegetative organs anatomy help to disentangle species complex? The cases of Neoregelia bahiana and Vriesea oligantha 30
Vivian Zambon (Unicamp) Pollination ecology of the Bromeliads from the Itatiaia National Park, Brazil: binding nectaries to ecology 30
Sandra Santa Rosa (Cena, USP) Floral development in Aechmea: understanding floral changes in a large and polyphyletic genus 30
Adriana Martinelli (Cena, USP) Application of floral developmental studies and in vitro cultivation in Bromeliaceae conservation. 30
 

Friday 12 October (8:00-11:30)

Symposium title: Recent advances in Bromelioideae systematics, taxonomy, and evolution     
Friday 12 October 08:00-11:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): Georg Zizka, Elton M. C. Leme and Juraj Paule

Symposium Abstract:            Bromelioideae is the second largest subfamily of Bromeliaceae and still the one posing substantial problems, especially as far as delimitation of genera, resolution of phylogenetic trees and the taxonomic value of morphological characters is concerned. The session presents new results in these fields, assessing progress achieved with NGS approaches and presenting new promising morphological characters. Bromelioideae underwent massive radiation in Brazil and might serve as a model system for the colonization of the principal Brazilian biomes (Mata Atlântica, Cerrado, Caatinga) followed by radiations.

Last update: 2018-05-10 12:22

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)*
E.M.C. Leme (Research Associate, Marie Selby Botanical Gardens - USA) Floral morphology still underexploited: the example of the Cryptanthoid complex 30
G.K. Brown (University of Wyoming, Laramie – USA) Limitation of molecular studies in Bromelioideae taxonomy 30
J. Paule (Senckenberg Research Institute and Goethe University Frankfurt - Germany) Genome size evolution in Bromelioideae 30
H. Halbritter*, E.M.C. Leme**, M. Barfuss* (*University of Vienna - Austria; **Research Associate, Marie Selby Botanical Gardens - USA) Pollen morphology and evolution in Bromelioideae 30
C. Ramirez Diaz  (Centro de Investigación Científica Yucatán, Merida - Mexico) Phylogeny of Central American Bromelioideae (Bromeliaceae) 15
J. Rodrigues Maciel (Recife Botanical Garden – Brazil) Systematics and evolution of Chevaliera 15
G. Zizka (Senckenberg Research Institute and Goethe University Frankfurt – Germany) New results from the Ochagavia-Fascicularia group using genome skimming 15
All participants and auditorium Concluding discussion 15
 

Symposium title: Monocots in society and tools to spread knowledge about monocots         
Friday 12 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Flamboyant


Organizer(s): Fernanda Antunes Carvalho and Leonardo M. Versieux

Symposium Abstract: This symposium will treat different aspects of e-taxonomy as well as tools to spread knowledge about monocots, including talks from software developers, editors, and field/education scientists.

Last update: 2018-07-31 11:03

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Fernanda Antunes Carvalho (Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte - Brazil) Towards an e-flora of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil 30
 Peter Stevens (Missouri Bot. Gardens - USA) Monocots and APweb: conventions, communication and biology, and when they conflict. 30
Bruce K. Kirchoff (The University of North Carolina Greensboro - USA) Visual Learning: Plant Identification and Beyond 30
Bruce K. Kirchoff (The University of North Carolina Greensboro - USA) and C. Caruso (Editor-in-Chief, Int. J. of Plant Science) How to get your paper accepted (or rejected) for publication: lessons from two editors 30
Livia Echternacht (Federal University of Ouro Preto - Brazil) Keys to Interactive Botany: experiences in museums, parks and classes with taxonomic interactive keys 30
Paul M. Peterson (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, USA) How to incorporate a worldwide phylogenetic classification in an herbarium using the Poaceae at the United States National Herbarium 30


Symposium title: Grass Systematics and Evolution—Plastome phylogenetics and the BOP Clade 
Friday 12 October 8:00-11:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Lynn Clark, Elizabeth Kellogg, R. Patricia de Oliveira and Pedro Viana

Symposium Abstract: In this symposium, we will focus on broad to fine scale phylogenetics, based mainly on plastomes or plastid markers, and the implications of these analyses for classification and evolutionary history in the grass family as a whole and within the BOP clade, one of the two major branches of the grass family. A large number of plastomes for the grass family are now available, and recent analyses largely have confirmed previously inferred relationships but have also allowed for more sophisticated analyses of potential bias, which are presented here. The BOP clade, consisting of the Bambusoideae, Oryzoideae and Pooideae, represents one of two major branches of the grass family, and includes over 5,500 species. Recent advances in understanding the systematics and evolution of the Bambusoideae (1,670+ species) and Pooideae (ca. 3,800 species) based on the phylogenetic analysis of plastid markers are presented.   

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:53

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Melvin Duvall (Northern Illinois University, U.S.A.), mel-duvall@niu.edu A 250-plastome phylogeny of the grass family 30
Paul Peterson (Smithsonian Institution, U.S.A.), PETERSON@si.edu A phylogeny and classification of the Poeae chloroplast group 1 (Pooideae: Poeae: Agrostidinae, Aveninae, Calothecinae, Echinopogoninae) 30
Liliana Giussani (Instituto Darwinion, Argentina), liligiussani@yahoo.com.ar Evolutionary systematics in dune species of Poa (Poaceae: Pooideae)   30
Pengfei Ma (Kunming Institute of Botany, China), mapengfei@mail.kib.ac.cn Taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography of the temperate woody bamboos (Bambusoideae: Arundinarieae) 30
Lynn Clark (Iowa State University, U.S.A.), lgclark@iastate.edu Systematics and evolution of the neotropical woody bamboos (Bambusoideae: Bambuseae)   30
R. Patricia de Oliveira (UEFS, Brazil), rpatricia@uefs.br Systematics and evolution of the herbaceous bamboos (Bambusoideae: Olyreae)   30


Friday 12 October (14:00-17:30)

Symposium title: Evolution and Diversification in Cyperaceae   
Friday 12 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Álamo


Organizer(s): William Wayt Thomas

Symposium Abstract: Recent developments in Cyperaceae research will be communicated, including tribal and generic concepts, polyploidy and holocentric chromosome evolution, and evolution and pollination ecology in the genus Rhynchospora.

Last update: 2018-07-10 22:19

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Isabel Larridon, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK Changing generic concepts in Cyperaceae: focus on Costularia s.l. 30
Suzana Costa, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil What about Cryptangieae (Cyperaceae)? Clarifying a Neotropical Gap in Sedges 15
Tammy Elliott, McGill University, Montreal, Canada   Unravelling Evolutionary Relationships in a Complex Polyploid Clade---the southern African Schoenus (Cyperaceae) 30
Pedro Jimenez-Mejias, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, USA A playground for Carex: resolving its backbone and fine-scale relationships using HybSeq    to 6th International Conference on Comparative Biology of Monocotyledons 15
José Ignacio Márquez-Corro, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain Holocentric Chromosome Evolution and its Impact in Diversification, with Special Emphasis on Sedges (Cyperaceae) 15
Andrea Pedrosa-Harand, UFPE, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil Evolution and Structure of Holocentric Chromosomes in Cyperids: the Case of Rhynchospora (Cyperaceae) 15
William Wayt Thomas, New York Botanical Garden, USA Major Clades and Morphological Trends in Rhynchospora (Cyperaceae) 15
Pedro Joel S. Silva Filho, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil   Phylogeny and Diversity in Rhynchospora section Tenues 15
Ana Carolina Costa, UFPE, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil Wind to Insect Pollination in Rhynchospora(Cyperaceae) 30


Symposium title: Grass Systematics, Evolution and Development—The PACMAD Clade
Friday 12 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Jacaranda


Organizer(s): Elizabeth Kellogg, Lynn Clark, R. Patricia de Oliveira, Pedro L. Viana

Symposium Abstract: The approximately 6,000 species collectively classified in the Panicoideae, Aristidoideae, Chloridoideae, Micrairoideae, Arundinoideae and Danthonioideae form the PACMAD clade, which along with the BOP clade (5,500+ species) is one of the two major branches of the grass family. A number of important crops such as maize, sorghum, sugarcane, the millets and tef, as well as other economically important plants (e.g., switchgrass and miscanthus for biofuels) are found in this clade. All 24+ independent origins of the C4 photosynthetic pathway in grasses occurred within the PACMAD clade, and PACMAD grasses are important components of both tropical and temperate grasslands. In this symposium, we will focus mainly on the Panicoideae, the most diverse subfamily within the PACMAD clade. Aspects of generic classification, nuclear markers and genomics, and grass floral development involving members of this subfamily will be addressed. An opportunity for general discussion of the topics included in this symposium as well as the other grass symposia will be provided in the final portion of this symposium.

Last update: 2018-05-03 00:55

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
Speaker Topic Time length (min)
Fernando Zuloaga (Instituto Darwinion, Argentina), fzuloaga@darwin.edu.ar Generic realignments in Paniceae and Paspaleae I 30
Christian da Silva (UEFS, Brazil), Christian_da_silva@hotmail.com Generic realignments in Paniceae and Paspaleae II 30
Tony Studer (University of Illinois, U.S.A.), astuder@illinois.edu Genomics of Steinchisma (Panicoideae: Paspaleae) 30
Cassiano Welker (UFU, Brazil), cassiano_welker@yahoo.com.br The use of low-copy nuclear genes in the delimitation of genera and species in the Andropogoneae (Panicoideae) 30
Madelaine Bartlett (University of Massachusetts Amherst, U.S.A.), madelaine.bartlett@gmail.com Grass floral development 30
Discussion General discussion 30


Symposium title: Reproductive biology and ecology of Bromeliaceae   
Friday 12 October 14:00-17:30 Room: Flamboyant
       

Organizer(s): Tânia Wendt and Ivón Ramírez

Symposium Abstract:  This symposium aims to explore the most recent advances in Bromeliaceae ecology, conservation, reproductive biology, and pollination systems.             

Last update: 2018-06-08 17:55

Overview of presentations and proposed time length:
  Waiting confirmation  
Alfredo Cascante-Marín (Univ. Costa Rica, Costa Rica) Ecological determinants of female reproductive success in the dioecious bromeliad Aechmea mariae-reginae 30
Fernanda Nogueira (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) The tank-inflorescence of Nidularium: Architecture, 3D model and the water role 30
Tânia Wendt (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Reversibility of breeding systems in bromeliads: history indicates paths to diversification 30
Gustavo Q. Romero (Unicamp, Brazil) Tank bromeliads, biological interactions and ecosystem functioning in the Anthropocene 30
Gustavo Martinelli (JBRJ, Brazil) Conservation of Brazilian Bromeliaceae: challenges and perspectives 30
 



Master Classes

We will have 2h classes with world renowned specialists. Meetings will take place from 19-21h.

Monday 08 October

Alexandre Antonelli, Ph.D.

Evolution and biogeography with focus on the Neotropics

Alexandre is a world leading scientist from University of Gothenburg researching different aspect of biodiversity evolution. In this 2h master class he will present the most recent tools to study biogeography and illustrate such kind of research with different examples, including monocots. His research group links the understanding of how biological diversity has evolved and how it will be affected by on-going climate change and habitat destruction. Alex will also be in charge of a pre-event graduate course on Biogeography together with other specialists. More information will come soon.



Tuesday 09 October

Nanuza Luíza de Menezes, Ph.D.

Meet one of the most famous Brazilian plant anatomists, Prof. Nanuza Menezes (University of São Paulo), who will present during this 2h master class her vast experience and knowledge on plant morphology, particularly anatomical adaptations found in the beautiful flora of unique Espinhaço mountain range "Campos Rupestres". A great chance to see and learn about these plants (mostly monocots) and also about her discoveries on monocots stems anatomy.



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6th international Conference on Comparative Biology of Monocotyledons